Center for Immigration Studies
On Reentry after Deportation, and Faithfully Executing the Laws

The Hispanic Trends Project of the Pew Research Center has recently issued a report: "The Rise of Federal Immigration Crimes: Unlawful Reentry Drives Growth".

As the introduction to the report details:

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A Postscript on Parole-in-Place

In November of last year, then-Director of U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) Alejandro Mayorkas issued a policy memorandum directing examiners to approve all requests for parole on behalf of illegal aliens in the United States who are family of present or former members of the military, including reservists.

Many observers, myself included, objected to the memorandum on both procedural and substantive grounds, and said as much in our various writings. See here, here, and here.

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A Tale of Two Judiciaries

Fla. v. Calif. re: illegal aliens practicing law

Even at the best of times, the law is a strange and wondrous thing. At its worst, it more closely approximates the description given it by Mr. Bumble in Charles Dickens’s Oliver Twist: “If the law supposes that … then the law is a ass, a idiot!”

Some weeks ago, the California Supreme Court, through a classic piece of legal legerdemain, declared that it was perfectly acceptable for an illegal alien to be enrolled as an attorney in the California State Bar — a prerequisite to actually practicing law before the various courts in that state. Many observers offered their opinions on this decision, yours truly among them.

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Anomalies Abound in the Economics of Illegal Immigration

The three-dimensional interface among illegal aliens, the labor market, and government programs contains a number of anomalies, some good public policy and some not.

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On License Plates and Metadata

This just in from our Department of Non Sequiturs and Oxymorons: The Associated Press reports that Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, citing privacy concerns, has canceled a contract that would have given agents of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) access to a national registry of vehicle license plate data.

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Parole-in-Place, Meet Military Misconduct Rates

In January, the Center published my Backgrounder "An Examination of the USCIS Parole-in-Place Policy", which analyzed a November 2013 policy memorandum issued by the director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) directing its adjudicators to grant the immigration benefit of parole to illegal-alien parents, children, and spouses of military, and prior military, members.

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On Advice of Rights in Removal Cases

The Ninth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals, the most liberal circuit in the country, has heard argument in two cases having to do with when, and how, government officers must provide aliens facing deportation proceedings advice of their rights, and what the appropriate remedies should be for failure to do so. The cases are Segovia v. Holder, and (ironically, given the name “Miranda warnings” that is applied to advice of rights in the criminal context) Miranda-Fuentes v. Holder.

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Welcome Attention Paid to the Usually Ignored Third Flow of Illegal Aliens

The usually neglected third flow of illegal aliens – those who manage to come through ports of entry when they should have been stopped – gathered some attention at an academic conference sponsored by Georgetown University last week.

The invitation-only session was part of a highly useful series sponsored by Georgetown’s Institute for the Study of International Migration; it was conducted under the Chatham House Rule; i.e., one can write about what was said, but one cannot attribute anything to a specific speaker.

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Prosecutorial Discretion, or Abuse of Discretion?

As it does from time to time, Syracuse University’s Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) has produced one if its statistical analyses with a prosaic name that belies its capacity to raise the eyebrows of anyone who takes the time to give it even just a bit more than cursory examination.

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Why Conservatives Should Consider Agreeing to a Real Immigration Reform Bill, Pt. 2

Who Are We?" was the title of an important, and in some quarters, controversial book by the late Harvard political scientist Samuel P. Huntington. Part of the answer to the title question is that this country was settled and built by those who came here from elsewhere. That iconic self-description of America as a "nation of immigrants" was and remains true ("true but only partially true," as Huntington writes).

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